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Moehre's Gimp Page

The stuff i've written for The GIMP
100% opensource (GPL or PD). SHARE AND ENJOY!
Note that all this stuff is tested on linux only - i've no idea if it runs/can be made running on windoze.
If you have trouble downloading stuff from this experimental CMS, don't hesitate to contact me.
     
The GIMP-barcode-plugin:
Renders a barcode image - either stand-alone or in a floating selection. You will need: On Debian, an "apt-get install gimp libgimp-perl barcode" should suffice to meet all the above requirements. Then throw the (unzipped) plugin into $HOME/.gimp-x.y/plug-ins/ or /usr/lib/gimp/x.y/plug-ins/, chmod a+x it, start gimp and click Xtns/Render/Barcode or Filters/Render/Barcode...

Update: Thanks to Jistan, it should now run flawlessly on gimp 2.4.
Downloads:
gimp-barcode-1.1.7z

Screenshots:
Barcode GUI

Barcode GUI
     
The GIMP-gifsicle-plugin:
Save layers as gif-animation
Why this, gimp already has "save-gif-animation"?

That feature is good for animations that don't require more than 256 colors for all frames. If you wanna make one from some photos, you'll notice that ugly, heavy dithering is introduced. This is due to a fundamental limitation of The GIMP: in indexed mode, it can only have one colormap (with at most 256 colors) for all frames (or layers), whereas a GIF-file can have one such colormap for each frame (plus a global one).

This plugin (with the help of the external "gifsicle"-program) produces GIF-animations with a local colormap for each frame (if thats required). Another little benefit of gifsicle is the ability to specify a loop count (instead of just "once"/"forever").

Other than that, it should behave exactly like gimps save-gif-animation: Strings like (123ms) (combine) (replace) in the layer-attributes are honored, and also the lowest layer in the list is displayed first.

Of course, there's a little price to pay:

  • its much slower
  • it needs temporary disk space

You will need:

  • The GIMP with perl support
  • perl
  • The Gifsicle program
  • Lots of libraries - ask your friendly package-manager...
On Debian, an "apt-get install gimp libgimp-perl gifsicle" should suffice to meet all the above requirements. Then throw the (unzipped) plugin into $HOME/.gimp-x.y/plug-ins/ or /usr/lib/gimp/x.y/plug-ins/, chmod a+x it, start gimp and click Filters/Animation/Gifsicle...

Downloads:
gimp-gifsicle-1.1.xz
(now works for gimp 2.6.10)
gimp-gifsicle.7z
(v1.0)

Screenshots:
Gifsicle GUI

Gifsicle generated Image
     
The GIMP-animation-attributes-plugin (formerly cleanup-layer-attr):

With this little plugin, you can easily tune animation related strings (like '(100ms)' or '(replace)') in the layer attributes. It came into existence because of a misfeature of gimps Filters/Animation/Optimize functions. They both add "(100ms)" to each layers name, which is not always wanted. Like the other plugins, this one too requires gimp with perl-support.
Download:
gimp-animation-attributes.7z

Screenshot:
Animation attributes plugin GUI
     
The GIMP-flag-waving-plugin:

This little plugin makes an animation that looks like a flag fluttering in the wind from a given image. The source image should contain exactly one layer! As usual, this one requires gimp with perl-support.
Download:
gimp-flag-waving.7z

Screenshots:
Flag-waving plugin GUI

Flag-waving plugin example
     
©2012 Lutz Möhrmann

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